4gifs:

The cat ate my homework

4gifs:

The cat ate my homework

chryswatchesgot:

Chrys Watches GoT [x]

twinkleofafadingstar:

so Charlotte Bronte read Emma by Jane Austen and was really interested in this minor character named Jane Fairfax who was poor and would have been a governess had she not married well and then Bronte wrote her own novel exploring the plight of the poor governess who married this guy named Edward Fairfax Rochester in a novel called Jane Eyre and my point is don’t let anyone tell you shit about fanfiction.

ethelreds:

nothing is impossible when the pirates of the caribbean theme plays in the background 

curlicuecal:

Games with English: insert the word “only” anywhere into the above sentence and consider how the placement changes meaning.

curlicuecal:

Games with English: insert the word “only” anywhere into the above sentence and consider how the placement changes meaning.

get to know me meme » [1/6] artists: john william waterhouse

lotrlockedwhovian:

PotC Inner Monologues: James Norrington 2/2 (requested by anon)

I’m laughing so hard right now. That last gif is the epitome of FUCKMYLIFE. 

PotC Internal Monologues - James Norrington 1/2 (requested by anon)

starklady:

probably my fav game of thrones cap ever

starklady:

probably my fav game of thrones cap ever

Ride along on an adventure where any lead character can die.”

Honest Trailers - Game of Thrones

A Royal Affair (2012)


mythology meme:  [6/8] myths, legends, and stories
↳ izanagi no mikoto and izanami no mikoto

Part of the Japanese creation myth, the story of Izanagi and Izanami tells of the birth of the eight great Japanese islands (at least the ones that were part of ancient Japan). Izanagi and Izanami played a part in both Kamiumi and Kuniumi, the birth of the gods and the birth of the lands.
Of the seventh and last generation of the great Kamiyonayo, Izanami and Izanagi would be responsible for both the birth of the Japanese islands as well as the birth of other gods, who’d later become deities. Although the beginning of their union was rocky, they succeeded. They had a great many children, but during the birth of Kagutsuchi, the god of fire, Izanami died from the severe burns. Izanagi killed Kagutsuchi and descended into Yomi, the underworld, to plead for his wife’s return. 
He found Izanami, but she stayed in the shadows of Yomi and told him she’d already eaten the food of the underworld and therefore belonged with the dead. However, Izanagi refused to take ‘no’ for an answer and after long negotiations, Izanami asked for a night’s rest before she returned to the world of the living with her husband, and warned him not to come to her bedroom. After waiting a long time, Izanagi got curious and entered the room. Using a comb from his hair, he made it into a torch, and in the beam of light he saw his once beautiful wife’s rotting and horrid form. Terrified, Izanagi fled while Izanami sent shikome after him. Eventually, Izanagi managed to exit Yomi, and rolled a large stone in front of its entrance. Izanami yelled from behind the stone that she’d kill a thousand people every day since he’d abandoned her. Izanagi answered that he’d give life to a thousand and five hundred. 

mythology meme:  [6/8] myths, legends, and stories

↳ izanagi no mikoto and izanami no mikoto

Part of the Japanese creation myth, the story of Izanagi and Izanami tells of the birth of the eight great Japanese islands (at least the ones that were part of ancient Japan). Izanagi and Izanami played a part in both Kamiumi and Kuniumi, the birth of the gods and the birth of the lands.

Of the seventh and last generation of the great Kamiyonayo, Izanami and Izanagi would be responsible for both the birth of the Japanese islands as well as the birth of other gods, who’d later become deities. Although the beginning of their union was rocky, they succeeded. They had a great many children, but during the birth of Kagutsuchi, the god of fire, Izanami died from the severe burns. Izanagi killed Kagutsuchi and descended into Yomi, the underworld, to plead for his wife’s return.

He found Izanami, but she stayed in the shadows of Yomi and told him she’d already eaten the food of the underworld and therefore belonged with the dead. However, Izanagi refused to take ‘no’ for an answer and after long negotiations, Izanami asked for a night’s rest before she returned to the world of the living with her husband, and warned him not to come to her bedroom. After waiting a long time, Izanagi got curious and entered the room. Using a comb from his hair, he made it into a torch, and in the beam of light he saw his once beautiful wife’s rotting and horrid form. Terrified, Izanagi fled while Izanami sent shikome after him. Eventually, Izanagi managed to exit Yomi, and rolled a large stone in front of its entrance. Izanami yelled from behind the stone that she’d kill a thousand people every day since he’d abandoned her. Izanagi answered that he’d give life to a thousand and five hundred.